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- News Feed -

August 16th for Salmon at the Bay!

              

Join NSEA in the Boundary Bay Brewery beer garden August 16th from 5:00-8:30 for our annual Salmon at the Bay Celebration, featuring a gourmet wild salmon dinner, local food, live music, auction, kid activities and more. This is a family-friendly event, all ages welcome! 

As part of this summer celebration, we will have photographs on display on the walls of Boundary Bay's restaurant featuring restoration, salmon and Northwest scenery. These framed photos are for sale all summer long. Proceeds go towards salmon habitat restoration projects in Whatcom County. 

NSEA is hiring for 2014-2015 AmeriCorp's positions! 


Come learn and serve with NSEA managing 
volunteers, running outdoor education programs or conducting scientific monitoring.


Click HERE to apply!






Thank you Earth Day volunteers; together we can make a difference!

Earth Day 2014!


NSEA has Board of Directors & Committee Positions Open! 
Which fits you best?

 



Thank you Bellingham Food Cooperative for attending our Earth Day restoration work party and documenting this special day with a video.


We appreciate our community so much!






- Fast Facts -

The Nooksack River Basin has all five species of Pacific salmon: chinook, chum, coho, pink, and sockeye salmon.

  • Chinook are the largest Pacific salmon species and can reach up to 135 pounds!
  • Coho have the nickname silver salmon because they retain their silvery ocean color longer than any other salmon species after entering fresh water.
  • In 2013, 1,789 Whatcom County students spent 15,721 hours participating in NSEA educational programs.
  • In 2013, 91 streamside habitat restoration work parties were held. 2,711 volunteers donated 6,787 hours to streamside work parties! 

Pacific salmon have disappeared from about 40% of their historical breeding ranges in Washington, Oregon, Idaho, and California over the last century, and many remaining populations are severely depressed in areas where they were formerly abundant.